Dark Chococlate and Firewhiskey Caramel Tart – Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: The Literary Kitchen #11

Dumbledore watched her fly away, and as her silvery glow faded he turned back to Snape, and his eyes were full of tears.
“After all this time?”
“Always,” said Snape.”
– J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Dark Chococlate and Firewhiskey Caramel Tart

Dark Chococlate and Firewhiskey Caramel Tart

Always! I think I will always be a Potterhead and would love the magical world that J.K. Rowling created, despite the bile inducing Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, despite people telling me that they’ve moved over, despite the awful movie version of The Deathly Hallows. That reminds me, did you watch Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them? I loved the film and the adorable beasts. I would love to have my own Bowtruckle and a Demiguise to babysit me. I think I should try making demiguise shaped dinner rolls like Jacob Kowalski in the film. Also, I cheered and hooted at every Harry Potter reference in the film. Continue reading

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Miso Prawn Okonomiyaki – Rice, Noodle, Fish: Deep Travels Through Japan’s Food Culture: The Literary KItchen #10

A well-worn Japanese proverb has it that Tokyoites spend all their money on footwear, Kyotoites on kimonos and formal attire. But Osakans save their funds for food and drink. There’s a word for this Osakan propensity, kuidaore: to eat until you drop.
– Matt Goulding, Rice Noodle Fish – Deep Travels Through Japan’s Food Culture

Okonomiyaki

It was Matt Goulding’s description of Osaka’s street food that made me pick the city as one of the three places to visit on my recent Japan trip. As I stepped inside a tiny sake bar on my first and only night in Osaka Namba, I knew that everything he mentioned was true to the last detail. The cheerful hellos, kanpai (cheers) with every drink ordered, sharing food with strangers and being offered to be accompanied to a crab place close-by, I experienced everything as it was straight out of Goulding’s book. And then there was Dotonbori, the thin stream of river teaming with restaurants and street-food stalls on both the sides – fried meat on stick, barbeques, yakisoba and Osaka’s own takoyaki and okonomiyaki. Takoyaki – the fried balls of gooey dough with a chewy nugget of octopus in the centre was a peculiar dish, but it was okonomiyaki that kept me hooked – the thick Japanese pancake studded with pork, with a generous drizzle of barbeque sauce and mayonnaise, and feathery bonito chips fluttering on top; few refills of Sapporo was all I needed to complete my meal. Continue reading

Pumpkin Pasties – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: The Literary Kitchen #9

“These hands have made over six million Pumpkin Pasties. I’ve got quite good at them. But what people haven’t noticed about my Pumpkin Pasties is how easily they transform into something else…”
– Trolley Witch, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

She picks up a Pumpkin Pasty. She throws it like a grenade. It explodes.

Pumpkin Pasties - Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: The Literary Kitchen #9

Pumpkin Pasties – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: The Literary Kitchen #9

Isn’t the idea of turning Pumpkin Pasties into grenades a bit far-fetched? I mean, I know it’s a magical world and anything can happen, but let’s leave the food alone. What if the magic fails once in a hundred times and the pasties explode in your stomach! Anyhow, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child has many such atrocious ideas, Voldemort and Bellatrix making a baby together being one of them. *Shudders* Continue reading

Whole Wheat Bread – Crumbs: The Literary Kitchen #8 – Blogversary Giveaway

“Remember, the bread you meet each day is still rising. Don’t scare the dough.”
– Macrina Wiederkehr

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Update on the Giveaway Contest – This contest is closed now and the lucky winner to get Saee’s book Crumbs is Raghav Modi. Congratulations!

I don’t remember exactly when I fell in love with baking breads. I have been making my own pizza for quite some time now and had baked my first Challah (Jewish Sabbath bread) a few years ago. But, it wasn’t until I baked my first multigrain loaf that I started to understand the science and technique behind bread baking. Still, using a convection microwave would just not end in satisfactory results. My baker friends would keep talking about the upsides of using an OTG (Oven Toaster Griller) and I would end up hating the microwave oven a bit more every day. A few weeks ago, after moving into a new house, I invested in a Morphy Richards OTG and inaugurated it with a whole wheat focaccia from Saee Koranne-Khandekar’s book Crumbs. It’s a gem of a book for perfect baking in Indian conditions; read more about it here. Continue reading

Potato Crust Pie – The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society: The Literary Kitchen #7

“I wonder how the book got to Guernsey? Perhaps there is some sort of secret homing instinct in books that brings them to their perfect readers.”
– Mary Ann Shaffer, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Imagine if it were true, wouldn’t it be the most amazing thing?

Potato Crust Pie - The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel pie Society: The Literary Kitchen #7

Potato Crust Pie – The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel pie Society: The Literary Kitchen #7

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society came to me through a recommendation from a book club that I am part of (checkout The Sunday Book Club on Twitter, they’re awesome). The book tugged at my heart and I think you have to be a real cynic to not fall in love with it instantly.

I am developing a love for books set during and right after World War II and while The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society is a work of fiction, it paints quite a real and believable picture of the occupation. The book is a beautiful collection of letters between Juliet Ashton, a British author in search of a subject for her next book, and the residents of Guernsey island who formed the literary society during the German occupation during World War II. The society is formed quite by accident when the residents find themselves breaking the curfew. The society eventually becomes a part of their life and also a way to break away from the life of scarcity and darkness.

Also Read: Felix Felicis – Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince: The Literary Kitchen #6 Continue reading